TreePro Kennels KEMMER STOCK MTN. CURS & Tn. Mtn. Hybrids

KEMMER CUR, KEMMER CURS, KEMMER STOCK MOUNTAIN CUR, MOUNTAIN CURS, HYBRIDS, CURS

KEMMER STOCK MTN CUR BREED STANDARDS

 (EXCERTS FROM THE KSBA YEAR BOOK)

1. Color: Black, Blonde, Blue, Brindle, Buttermilk Buckskin, Chocolate and variations of these colors. White points are permitted.

2. Head: Dome flat, wide between the eyes, heavy muzzle, short to medium ears set high with full control, eyes dark, prominent and expressive. Neck strong and muscular.

3. Body: Deep broad chest, back straight and strong, coat smooth or rough, with a soft undercoat.

4. Tail: Natural bob or bobbed preferred, but full length with high carriage permitted.

5. Feet: Cat paw type, strong and well muscled, set for speed, dew claws preferred.

6. Legs: Straight, muscular, set for speed.

7. Voice: Open, semi-open, or silent on track with good clear bark that can preferably be herd a long distance.

8. Height: Males at shoulder: 18-26 inches. Female at shoulder: 16-24 inches.

9. Weight: In proportion to height and body structure.

10. Characteristics: Strong treeing and hunting instinct. Cold nose for winding ability, but will take the best tracks and will run to catch. Will circle and drift on a cold track until they can run it hot. Easily discouraged from unwanted game. Courageous fighters on dangerous game. They have the desire to please their masters. If given the chance, they can be taught to perform any task. The more human contact they have, the better they respond to training. They will make great companions and watch dogs if given a chance. 

 

 

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The following is from Robert Kemmer on what he wants out of his dogs,and what he breeds his dogs for.

Robert’s Standards for Breeding:

1. Extreme intelligence. This makes them able to be taught anything.

2. Easy to handle. After a few hunts, throw away the leash.

3. Hunt hard and fast, but not too far away. Check in about every thirty minutes if not on track.

4. Know where the game travels. Check stumps, logs, and trees as  they pass to see whether game has traveled on them.

5. Extremely tree-minded. Usually hard tree dogs. Tree on the tree by themselves. Tree sitting back if hunted with company.

6. Have a clear chop mouth. Easy to tell when treed. Do not leave on a backtrack because would rather tree than run.

7. Have a desire to catch game which makes them easy to train and break off undesired game. If they can’t catch it, they will quit running it.

8. Make cold tracks appear hot. Circle and drift until they find the hot end of tracks and run to catch. Do not open on a track that cannot be moved.

"They must have super winding ability and tree layup game that hasn’tbeen on the ground."

9. Work on bear and boar. Have speed to bite and circle game in one motion and keep the animal turning.

10. Have a strong desire to please their master. Need and thrive on attention.

11. Make all around farm and ranch hands. Take possession and keep order. Guard the chicken house and catch intruders. Guard the children. Keep livestock in the field. Can heel a cow like a stock dog. Can get rough with a mean cow.

12. Will catch every groundhog on a farm even if it takes all summer. Will crawl on their stomachs to stalk a groundhog trying to get between groundhog and den. Can track a snake like a squirrel.

The Kemmer Stock Mt. Curs will amaze you daily and truly serve as mans best friend. Hopefully, this outline of what Robert looks for will give you a better idea of what our dogs are bred for and expected to do.

Nothing on the face of this earth will make a liar out of you faster that a kid or a dog. Remember that each animal is an individual, and must be treated as such. No animal is perfect. Our dogs should be given a fair chance just as you would any breed. They are cur dogs, not hounds. Thus, as a rule, curs and hounds should not be treated the same. If you do not have experience with curs, by all means contact a KSBA member for advice. Our association is made up of individuals who want to promote the breed, and will be glad to help you. You should never BEAT a cur. You should show them what is expected. When you take a pup from its mother, put it in your pocket. Take it wherever you go. A year old cur that has been treated in this manner would give its life for you. You will have made an unwavering best friend for life. These dogs are people oriented, and have the strong need to please their master.